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13 Types Of Strawberries – Seasonal Varieties

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Indulge in the world of various types of strawberries – a fruit adored globally for its sweet taste and versatility. Effortless to cultivate, delightfully aromatic in the spring, and supremely tasty, whether enjoyed in pies, pastries, atop desserts, or simply fresh and natural.

Ever wondered about the diversity of strawberries? You’re in luck! In this article, we’ll delve into the numerous types of strawberries, sharing fascinating facts about these cherished berries and details on distinct varieties you can cultivate.

We’ll categorize them based on their fruiting periods, guiding you to plan effectively and ensure a bountiful harvest whenever strawberries can thrive in your backyard.

So, if you’re ready, let’s explore the various types of strawberries and gain insights on maximizing the potential of each seasonal variety!

Types of strawberries – Taking a closer look

There is a part of the United States Department of Agriculture called GRIN, which is short for ‘Germplasm Resources Information Network, and while the ‘germplasm’ certainly isn’t the loveliest sounding word, what it refers to is seeds, plants, and parts of plants that are highly useful in conservation efforts, breeding, and research. So, when you hear the term ‘germplasm’, it’s just referring to plant cultures!.

According to GRIN, there are currently 103 distinct types of strawberry species and hundreds of cultivars out there, which is really kind of amazing when you think about it1 While we would like to talk about all of them, discussing color, flavor, and more, we sadly do not have the space for that – but we’ll see what we can do about giving you a good-sized sample! 

Strawberry varieties basically break down into these 3 types::

  • June Bearing strawberries
  • Everbearing strawberries
  • Day Neutral strawberries

We’ll tell you a little more about these types and give you some examples in the sections below. Let’s take a look!

June Bearing varieties

June bearing strawberries are probably the ones that get grown the most commonly. They break down into early season, midseason, and late season varieties, but what they have in common is that you get big, beautiful berries starting in June and lasting usually for 2 or 3 weeks.

Knowing what part of the season they fruit in lets you plant accordingly, so that you can greatly extend the time that you are getting those delicious berries – below are some examples from early season, midseason, and late season varieties’ so that you can see exactly what we mean.

Early season varieties

In this section, we’ve got some early season strawberries that will start fruiting in the late spring, making them the earliest fruiting options in this category. We’ve collected a sampling of 3 of them for you to give you an idea of what you’ll be getting if you go with these early season varieties. Let’s take a peek at these delicious early-blooming berries!

1. Alba

Strawberries growing in the field.
Strawberries growing in the field.
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria vesca f. alba
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Originally bred in Celena, Italy, the Alba strawberry is commonly grown in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia, where it’s popular for being both a vigorous option and one which produces a high yield of strawberries. These plants can grow up to 13 inches tall and they produce quite a lot of large, lovely, and bright- green leaves, and the berries themselves are moderately fragrant and dense, but not so much that there’s a crunch to them. 

As far as the taste, opinions differ, but most seem to agree that their neither exemplary nor awful, but rather just taste like ‘regular strawberries’, but they are also tolerant of mildew and highly resistant to most root diseases – so think of them as ‘regular strawberries on steroids’ and you have a fairly accurate assessment of the Alba.

2. Annapolis

Annapolis strawberry on weaved basket
Annapolis strawberry on weaved basket
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Phytophthora fragariae Hickrnan. Annapolis
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Next up we have another hardy variety of strawberry called the Annapolis and like the Alba, it’s highly resistant to winter’s wiles and produces a high yield and goodly sized strawberries after many successive harvests. This variety comes from Nova Scotia and has somewhat of a ‘medium’ level of red to its coloration and it’s considered quite sweet to the taste.

Annapolis is also highly resistant to red stele disease, so if you’ve had problems with red stele before, then you’ve got a ready-made strategy in these sweet, delicious Annapolis strawberries!

3. Asia

Asia strawberries on a picnic table
Asia strawberries on a picnic table
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria orientalis
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Originally bred in Italy, the Asia strawberry is another robust variety that is cold-resistant enough that it is cultivated in ALL regions of Russia. With the ability to withstand temperatures of -16 below, you’d think that the berries would be small and unappealing, but it’s quite the opposite – the Asia strawberry tends to produce fruits that weigh in at up to 45 grams and sometimes a little MORE.

They are also good producers, with up to 2 pounds of strawberries from one bush being the average yield, and the berries you’ll get are large and sweet. They are also resistant to bacteria, but susceptible to mildew, so this is an important fact to keep in mind if you choose to grow Asia strawberries.

Midseason varieties

Midseason strawberries start producing their fruits a little bit later than early season varieties, typically within about 8 days of them. There are exceptions – ‘early midseason’ varieties may pop up fruits within 5 days of the early season strawberries, while ‘late midseason’ breeds may take around 10 days before they will start to show you their fine, fresh fruits.

In this section, we have 3 midseason varieties for you by way of example and we’ll tell you a little about each one, just in case you fancy planting them yourself! 

4. Allstar

Hand full of Allstar variety strawberries
Hand full of Allstar variety strawberries
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria ananassa ‘Allstar’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Vigorous, high-yielding, and a strawberry that does quite well from the East all the way to the Central Midwest, Allstar strawberries are the next showcase variety on our list. We aren’t kidding about them being vigorous, either – these strawberries were bred to be highly resistant to red stele and verticillium wilt, as well as moderately resistant to powdery mildew and leaf scorch.

The berries that you’ll get are large, well-shaped, firm, and sweet – truly ‘Allstars’ indeed – so consider these midseason strawberries when you’re strategizing your crop. They’re well-worth your while!

5. Florence

Florence strawberries in bowls on a picnic table
Florence strawberries in bowls on a picnic table
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Florence’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

A late midseason strawberry, the Florence strawberry will usually produce its fruits from late June until the end of July. This popular option isn’t very tall, typically reaching about 8 inches in height with a 12 inch spread, but the berries it will give you are plentiful and sweet. This variety also does well in containers, just in case you need to save a little space, and it’s been bred with some good resistance abilities as well.

It’s moderately resistant to fungal leaf diseases, including powdery mildew, and has a good resistance to crown rot and verticillium. It can also tolerate vine weevils to some extent, so if you are looking for a hardy berry then the Florence might be just what the doctor ordered!

6. Honeoye

Honeoye Strawberries in a bowl
Honeoye Strawberries in a bowl
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Honeoye’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Our final midseason entry is the Honeoye, a breed that has been a favorite of strawberry fans for over 30 years now! It’s easy to see why, too. This particular variety of strawberry is not only highly winter-resistant, but also produces a high yield of berries for you that are perfect for freezing, making jams, or simply enjoying them immediately as they are. 

They have a darker red coloration to them and as far as the tasting experience, they are firm, juicy and quite sweet – especially if grown in a lighter soil medium. When you add in that they have excellent disease resistance, then their 30+ years of popularity is not a mystery at all – Honeoyes are tough and tenacious, yet soft and sweet!  

Late season varieties

In this section we’ve got the late season strawberries, which will typically bear fruit approximately 14 days after the early season berries. If you’re a huge strawberry fan, then you’ll definitely want to have some of these in your garden, and once you’ve covered the early, midseason, and late season then you’ll want to see the strawberries that we have in the next section!

For now, though, let’s look at the late season strawberries and you can see what you think!

7. Governor Simcoe

Governor Simcoe Strawberries in a bowl on a kitchen table
Governor Simcoe Strawberries in a bowl on a kitchen table
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria x ananassa ‘Elegance’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

The Governor Simcoe strawberry is an interesting breed which exhibits cup-shaped leaves as it grows to a maximum height of around 8 inches, with a 24 inch spread. This variety is winter resistant and also produces a high yield of tasty, sweet berries, with little ‘lemon eyes’ on the stems as well. 

While they are highly disease resistant, the caveat with these berries is that they are susceptible to leaf blight and powdery mildew, so you’ll need to keep this in mind and prepare accordingly if you want to raise some Governor Simcoes. 

8. Judibell

Judibell strawberries in a bowl
Judibell strawberries in a bowl
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Judibell’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Judibells are another popular variety that have a little sweet and sour thing going for them. The large, conical berries that you get from this variety taste a little like wild strawberries, but with a slight hint of tang for a flavorful contrast. Judibells are also a hit for their long shelf life and fairly uniform bright red coloration. 

Aside from these perks, the Judibell is fairly winter resistant, and moderately resistant to leaf scorch disease and powdery mildew, and it’s EXTREMELY resistant to verticillium. If you like your strawberries to be long-lasting and to taste a little like wild forest strawberries, then the Judibell might be the right late season strawberry for you! 

9. Ovation

Ovation strawberries in a clay pot
Ovation strawberries in a clay pot
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Ovation’
  • Other Names:  Garden Strawberry

Information about this variety

 A cross between Etna and Lateglow strawberries, Ovation strawberries have cup shaped leaves and lemon eyes like Governor Simcoes, but this breed has been around since 2003. Filed with the Department of Agriculture, these were originally bred for nurseries and popular for being easy to grow, highly disease-resistant, and for producing high yields of strawberries in the late season – you probably know them already as the ‘Garden strawberry’!

Attractive in their reliable symmetry, the berries produced are also firm and sweet, and they’re highly resistant to root rot and red stele. They are also moderately resistant to crown rot and anthracnose fruit.  It’s tough – but oh so tasty!

Everbearing and Day Neutral Varieties

Our final section of strawberries is a two-for-one special that covers ‘everbearing’ and ‘day neutral’ varieties. The names are a little misleading – everbearing, for instance, doesn’t mean they just produce strawberries every day forever, but rather that they kick out berries 2 seasons every year. This is usually during spring and summer, or sometimes spring and fall, depending on the berry and your location.

Day Neutral varieties, however, are pretty neat – these breeds will give you strawberries that are quite delicious even the first year that you plant them, but they’ll also produce berries whenever the temperature range is between 35 and 85 degrees! Why they aren’t called ‘everbearing’ instead, who can say (although sometimes you’ll hear them called ‘everbearing’ anyway), but they are definitely a variety that you should consider cultivating if you love delicious strawberries. 

There is one caveat, of course – Day Neutral strawberries are a little smaller than the other kinds, seldom exceeding 1 inch overall, but since they’ll keep on showing up, it seems like a pretty fair trade!

With that in mind, we’ll show you two varieties of each, starting with Everbearing first.

10. Alpine

Alpine Strawberries close up on vine
Alpine Strawberries close up on vine
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria vesca ‘Alpine’
  • Other Names:  Wild strawberry

Information about this variety

Providing you with strawberries between June and October, Alpines are more commonly known as ‘Wild strawberries’ and while they originally hail from Europe and Asia, you can also find the growing wild around North America if you’re having a very lucky hike in the great outdoors. 

They are quite delicious, but also quite small, typically producing fingernail-sized fruits that sometimes have a hint of pineapple to the flavor! Beyond this, another distinctive trait is their lack of runners, and the leaves are small, serrated, and trifoliate. Best of all, as they are wild strawberries, they’re pretty tough when it comes to the chill and resisting disease. The fruits are tiny, but you won’t regret adding Alpines to your strawberry crop strategy – it’s like a delicious walk on the wild side!

11. Calypso

Calypso strawberries in a field
Calypso strawberries in a field
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Calypso’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Another variety brought to you by Horticulture Research of East Mailing, the Calypso is an everbearing strawberry that’s new in town and one that we think you’ll be happy to make welcome. That’s because the Calypso delivers large, well-shaped fruits starting in July until you get the first frost, and then a bigger yield again between August and September. Highly resistant to verticillium wilt, one of the perks of these beauties is that they still taste nice and sweet if raised in a hot environment – not a bad perk at all if you live somewhere with aggressive summer seasons!

12. Albion

Albion Strawberries laying in grass
Albion Strawberries laying in grass
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Albion’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Our first Day Neutral variety is the Albion strawberry and it’s a fairly recent addition to the berry world from California that was first bred back in 2006. What you get with these berries is pretty nifty, too – large, shapely fruits that are consistently conical which are designed to withstand hot, summer heat and typically keep on producing until the late fall. As far as size, they’ll grow about 12 inches high, with a spread of 12 to 24 inches, so they’re also quite manageable.

When you add in that they are easy to care for and yield a large, happy crop, then it’s hard to say no to growing these already, but the cherry on top is that they are also resistant to verticillium wilt, anthracnose, and Phytophthora crown rot. Not too shabby at all, we think! 

13. Evie 2

Evie 2 strawberries in garden
Evie 2 strawberries in garden
  • Difficulty Level: Beginner
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Scientific Name: Fragaria × ananassa ‘Evie 2’
  • Other Names: None

Information about this variety

Our final berry is another Day Neutral known lovingly as the Evie 2 and these strawberries will spring up quickly, typically producing fruits within 12 to 14 weeks of planting. If you are familiar with Everest strawberries, these are considered to be ‘part 2’ of the Everest, designed to be higher yielding and also much less sensitive to the heat outside. 

Light and sweet, the final perk of this breed is that they have hardy leaves, so that leaf diseases that would cripple another crop will have a hard time getting ahold of your Evie 2’s!

FAQs

As is tradition here, before we take our leave, we’ve compiled a few frequently asked questions about strawberry types that we hope you’ll enjoy. There is really quite a lot to these fantastic fruits and by way of example, here are some questions that people ask about strawberries daily on the internet

What is the oldest strawberry cultivar?

Strawberries ready to be picked on a plant

There are quite a few, but one of the oldest is the Royal Sovereign, which has been widely grown for well over 100 years now. It’s softer than most strawberries and the flesh inside is typically crimson or orange-pink – definitely not your everyday berry unless you decide to grow them yourself and see what all the fuss is about!

Which type of strawberry is the sweetest?

Alpine Strawberries close up on vine

That’s a tricky question, although many agree that it would be the Alpine strawberries that are the sweetest. These small, colorful berries pack a whole lot of flavor, sometimes even tasting a bit like pineapple when you bite into one! They’re easy to grow, as well, and well worth cultivating if you’ve never dried these little wonders.

Who has the best strawberries in the world?

Strawberries ready to be picked

Japan may love strawberries more than just about any other country on the planet and their Amaou is thought to be the best strawberry in the world. Often exported as a luxury snack, the Japanese call it the ‘King of Strawberries. The taste is said to be sweet and very mild on acid, so that you don’t get the sour flavor that sometimes comes from an unlucky berry bite. The name Amaou even comes from a combination of its best qualities – Amai(sweet) + marui(round) + okii(big) + umai (tasty) – so we’re definitely curious to try one!

Are there really pink strawberries in Japan?

fresh-strawberries-have-not-been-collected-from-a-strawberry-plant

Yes, there ARE pink strawberries in Japan called Awayuki strawberries, that are light pink and highly prized for their delicate appearance, strong aroma, and delicious taste. While they are considered rare, they definitely DO exist and you can find them in Japan!

What fertilizer makes strawberries sweet?

Strawberries growing in the field.

You’ll want to experiment with your berries, as conditions are going to be very different depending on where you are growing them, but a balanced NPK fertilizer at the beginning of the growing season and after your harvest will help to ensure sweet berries and a stronger crop of them in the year that follows!

Some closing words on types of strawberries

Today we’ve explored the wonderful world of strawberries and what an extensive one it is! With hundreds of cultivars being grown around the world, what we think of as a ‘common flavor’ is really amazingly complex. 

We hope that you’ve enjoyed learning more about these types of strawberries and if you have a bit of a green thumb, then be sure to play with some of these cultivars. With careful planning for the 3 June season types, everbearing, and day neutral varieties, you might just be surprised how many times of the year you can still enjoy fresh strawberries!

Thanks for reading and we hope to see you again soon!

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